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FAQ

These are sample questions and answers. Individual situations require personal attention, so please don't rely on these to handle your issues.

1. WHAT DO YOU DO ABOUT THE ASSETS AND DEBTS OF A LOVED ONE WHEN HE OR SHE PASSES?

Of course, you first must cope with your grief and the responsibilities of making funeral and burial arrangements. Then, you can call our office to verify what you need and when to come in for your free consultation. You generally need to collect his or her documents, like the most recent bank and credit card statements, deeds, and any Will or Trust.


2. WHAT IS PROBATE?

Probate is a legal process in Court to transfer ownership from the deceased to beneficiaries or to a third party purchaser. If there is no Will, then the law decides who gets the deceased's property. Or worse yet, the property may go to the State.


3. DOES A WILL AVOID PROBATE COURT?

No. I like to call a Will simply a document that tells the judge to whom you want to receive your assets. To avoid probate, contact our office and we can help you decide what you need to do.


4. WHO GETS MY ASSETS IF I DIE WITHOUT A WILL OR TRUST?

If you die with assets in your name alone, without a proper Will or Trust, the laws of your State decide who gets your property. So some distant relative, or someone you don't know may get your property. And again, even the State may get your property under certain circumstances.


5. HOW DOES A TRUST WORK?

It is too complicated to completely describe here, but essentially it's a legal document that states who receives your assets after you pass, and who's in charge of the Trust. Further, Probate Court is bypassed, if all assets are held by the Trust.


6. WHAT ULTIMATELY COSTS MORE, PROBATE OR A TRUST?

Usually going through probate costs thousands of dollars more than using a properly drafted Trust.

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